Month: December 2018

Book Review: McDowell

Thanks to OnlineBookClub.org for providing me with the opportunity to read and review this.

This was, in my opinion, a very strange book. I shall attempt to summarise the plot briefly, but I’m afraid I am going to find it quite difficult. The plot was very… all over the place, for lack of a better term.

As the title suggests, this novel follows the life of Hiram McDowell, a wealthy surgeon and father. He has been married several times, and is currently with his wife Carole, who has two daughters of her own. One of the first noteworthy happenings involves one of these daughters, Tasha, and Hiram’s son, Billie. Tasha falls pregnant with Billie’s child. Hiram refuses to accept this, denying Billie’s involvement with Tasha or his responsibility with the child. A restraining order is placed against Billie, and he falls into a depression of sorts. The next major event involves Hiram’s eleven-year-old grandson, Jeremy. His mother has known something was different about him for a while, but her husband refused to listen. Eventually, Jeremy goes on a killing spree, shooting classmates, teachers, his sister and his mother, before then shooting himself. But he is not dead – severely brain-damaged and unconscious, but alive nonetheless. Hiram’s second daughter, Sophie, tries to encourage Jeremy to communicate with them, to show that he can hear them. But McDowell does not believe he will ever recover.

Soon, Jeremy passes away. Evidence suggests McDowell’s involvement in the death; murder? Euthanasia? He is convicted and sentenced to several decades imprisonment. But before long, McDowell decides he doesn’t deserve this, and so he escapes. His past experience in hiking and mountain-climbing enables him to survive without proper human contact for weeks, months, at a time, until he believes it is safe enough for him to migrate back into society. He begins a new life, developing different identities and beginning to earn a living again. He meets a lot of people, many of which become quite attached to him. But the law soon comes after him, and he is forced to move on.

In the end, McDowell is betrayed by a woman who’s life he saved. He is shot dead, accused of resisting the arrest despite no evidence of any weapons or fighting.

Of course, there are a lot of subplots that I haven’t included. There are also a lot of characters that have gone unnamed; too many, I believe. I couldn’t keep track of all the different characters and stories in the end. I got a bit lost, and felt no emotional connection to any of them whatsoever. This was probably my biggest criticism; there was a distinct lack of emotion. At the end of the novel, it was suggested that McDowell had grown as a person since his arrest, but I didn’t see any of this character growth myself. I didn’t feel anything.

Another issue I had with this book was the repetitive nature of the writing. Several details were repeated within close proximity, removing any subtlety to the writing. I also found that the inner dialogue of characters was not particularly convincing, sounding clunky and awkward.

Throughout the book there were paragraphs in italics, supposedly a separate narrative/summary of the events. But these paragraphs sounded exactly the same as the rest of the writing, and I failed to understand why they were separated from the rest of the text by being in italics.

I know there are a lot of negatives in this review, but I didn’t actually hate the book. I can’t say I enjoyed it, either, though. There was definite room for improvement, and very little that was noteworthy in a positive way. I’m giving this book 1 out of 5 stars.

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Graphic Novel/Illustrated Book Review: Petit (The Ogre Gods, Book #1)

Thank you to Edelweiss+ for providing me with a copy of this book!

This book was a sort of combination of a graphic novel and a novella. The ‘current’ plot was portrayed through a series of comics, while stories from the past were written out with a few illustrations here and there.

The concept of this book was really interesting. While being viewed as a runt by most other ogres, Petit was seen by his mother to be the savior of his kind. His grandmother, on the other hand, was hopeful that Petit would be able to live a human life, rather than be one of the ‘monsters’.

There was a slightly creepy, disturbing feel to some of this, especially where Petit’s mother wanted him to “breed” with human girls. Petit’s own relationship with one girl was a little confusing to me; I thought he really liked her, but then he went on to have a relationship with another ogre instead. In general, this was a little confusing to me. But I must say that this may be partly due to my edition being a draft copy, and so the layout was not quite correct.

I really liked this story, and really wanted to like it, but was left a little lost at times. For this reason, I’m giving it 3.5 stars.

Book Review: Bone and Bread

A huge thanks to Edelweiss+ for providing me with a copy of this novel.

As I’ve mentioned many times on my blog, I have anorexia. I struggle with mental health issues and I believe books on the topic are extremely important. This took my interest for that reason, but I didn’t expect this unique view. Beena’s sister, Sadhana, is diagnosed with anorexia at 14 – after a rather traumatic, difficult childhood. Beena recaps their early days, while simultaneously narrating her current-day life. At first, Beena only vaguely references Sadhana’s illness, but it soon becomes clear that her heart attack was brought on by the eating disorder.

This book is about Sadhana’s struggle, her sister’s sire attempts to help her, and her grief at Sadhana’s eventual passing, but it is also about so much more. It is about Beena’s teenage pregnancy and single motherhood. It is about the death of their parents, one by one, before they were even midway through their teens. It is about Sadhana’s on-off struggles, Beena’s exhaustion at being her carer, their relationship and arguments and love. It is also about Sadhana’s life, separate to Beena’s, her secret girlfriend. It’s about life overall, really. And while the anorexia is a huge part of it, it isn’t the whole story.

It was written fantastically, and the opinions Beena gives on Sadhana’s illness are really quite unique. She expresses her anger and frustration, and the tiring nature of caring for her sister throughout her life. She does not express the sympathy and sadness toward sufferers that is often portrayed in books.

Sometimes, I did find Beena a bit too harsh – and Sadhana, too, actually. But overall the characterisation was great, and the relationship between the girls is so complex it feels real. 4.5 stars.

Book Review: Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

I’m a bit late to this party, but I finally read it! It was released a while ago now, and I’ve been trying to get it finished for some time, but life got in the way. Anyway, here is my review at last.

Throughout a decent chunk of the novel, I felt like there actually was no plot. Not in a bad way, but it was almost just a narration of Eleanor’s life. The writing was so interesting and Eleanor so unique as a character that I liked that, though. And then a plot did start to develop, albeit not a particularly active one. As in, it was mostly about the past, not something that actually happened during the story. Like usual, I won’t say too much about it.

Eleanor is a very strange individual, with absolutely no social skills whatsoever. It’s rather comical at first, her attempts at everyday life quite laughable. But it’s later revealed why she has such difficulty, and I found myself feeling incredibly bad for her. Her story is sad, and although I had guessed at what had happened, her personal revelation was huge. After a failed attempt at ‘fixing’ her life, Eleanor finds herself at rock bottom. But miraculously, she has someone to help her, who cares about her well-being. With his help, Eleanor learns some new coping mechanisms, and begins to rebuild her life.

Thank you to the author/publisher for accepting my request to read and review this book

I really liked this book, and the writing was great. Eleanor’s personality was conveyed through the writing perfectly. 4.5 stars.