bloomsbury childrens publishing

Book Review: The Legacy

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The Legacy by Gemma Malley (The Declaration #3) – Paperback, 288 pages – Published November 8th 2012 by Bloomsbury Children’s

 

When I first read Malley’s The Declaration series this third novel hasn’t yet been released. And then I kind of forgot about the series until the end of last year.

Anna and Peter have found a safe residence in the countryside thanks to the Underground, the resistance movement against the use of Longevity. But their safety is being compromised as some unknown “illness” is spreading through the Legals – killing people who are supposed to live forever. People are pointing the finger at everyone around them, fear spreading even quicker than the virus.

Jude and Sheila are living in the main Underground facility, but are forced to move base when their leader, Pip, hands himself in and a brick comes flying in through their window. Meanwhile, Peter’s ring is of high importance to Richard Pincent, who has arranged with some unknown Underground member for it to be sent to him.

Without Pip, Jude has to take over. But he wasn’t expecting his half-brother to arrive, especially without the rest of his family. And now Sheila’s disappeared…

Why are people dying? Are the Underground really to blame?

And then, when he didn’t think things could any worse, Jude sees Pip talking to Richard Pincent’s closest friend and guard, as if they were friends.

Is this really the end of the Underground? Have they finally lost?

I noticed a lot of typos and punctuation mistakes, which gave the book a bit of an unprofessional, juvenile feel. But I’ve always loved this series and honestly I found the book so easy to read and enjoyable, despite the mistakes. There are some really interesting twists, and the story focuses a lot on characters other than Anna an d Peter which is nice.

4 stars for this book.

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Book Review: All Our Yesterdays

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All Our Yesterdays by Cristin Terrill – Paperback, 360 pages – Published August 1st 2013 by Bloomsbury Childrens

Okay, the plot of this book is kind of complicated and my summary probably won’t do it justice, but here goes:

Em and Finn have been held prisoners in their cells for months. The doctor puts them through horrific interrogations on a regular basis, trying to determine the location of some documents he believes to be in the possession of Finn and Em.

Em is obsessed with the drain in the centre of her cell, positive that it has some kind of important meaning. Eventually, she manages to unscrew it, and discovers something incredibly unexpected; a note from herself.

With the the help of Mike Connor, a guard that other versions of themselves had convinced to help them in the past, Em and Finn escape their cells and make their way to Cassandra. Before the doctor can stop them, they switch on the machine and are transported four years into the past.

This is written from two different perspectives; Em’s, and Marina’s. Through each girl’s story, we discover the truth about the doctor, Cassandra, and the death of Nate, the brother of Marina’s childhood love’s brother.

I know this all sounds really complicated, and sometimes it does get that way, but it is written so well. Em looks at Marina like she’s a different person, which I suppose she is, really. The relationships between each version of Marina/Em and the two different boys is so unique to this book. I suppose it’s a regular love triangle, but at the same time, it’s not.

I really liked this book. It’s not quite made it’s way to my favourites list due to the fact that there were times where I got a little bit lost. But it definitely deserves 4.5 stars, because it is such an gripping, unique book. I’m so glad I read this.

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