crime

Book Review: Little Darlings

Little Darlings by Melanie Golding – eBook, 336 pages Published April 30th 2019 by HarperAvenue

I am a huge fan of thriller, detective and suspense novels. I also adore fantasy elements, which this book incorporated fantastically.

Right from the very beginning, this novel creates a sense of unease and suspense. Even when Lauren meets her twin sons, I felt myself waiting for something to happen.

Throughout the novel are excerpts of folk tales, fairy-tales, rhymes and so on relating to changelings. So naturally, you expect something to happen within this area. It made it so much more exciting, like you are always waiting for something bad to happen.

What I especially liked about this novel was that it really blurred the lines between reality and fantasy or even the supernatural. I don’t want to ruin this for anyone who may read it, but the ending is somewhat open. It leaves space for your own interpretation; though certain things are strongly hinted at. All throughout the novel there is an ongoing debate as to whether the ‘case’ of Lauren Tranter is an actual criminal case, or simply a mental health case. I found this super intriguing.

Thank you to the author/publisher for accepting my request to read and review this book

Overall, this was a great book. The ending could be seen as somewhat unfulfilling, but I liked how it left some things to the readers’ own imagination. 4 out of 5 stars!

Book Review: The Silent Patient

I’m really glad I found this book – it was almost perfect for me! The narrator, Theo Faber, is a forensic psychotherapist, which is what I’m studying at uni starting this September! I will admit this possibly made the job out to be a lot more exciting and dramatic than it often is in reality, but pretty much every book on this topic does the same thing. It did include a fair amount of subject-specific terminology which I appreciated, but not so much that it was overwhelming or too much like a textbook.

I’m not going to discuss the plot much at all, as a) it’s really quite confusing, and b) I don’t want to ruin it at all for any potential readers. The bare bones of this is basically Theo working with Alicia Berenson, who was charged for the murder of her husband, but hasn’t talked since the day of his death. It’s almost a detective novel – Theo wants to find out what really happened, and why. At the same time, Theo has things going on in his personal life, and in his spare time he also follows ‘leads’ regarding Alicia’s case – her friends, family. It becomes more than just therapy, for sure.

As expected, there are twists and shocking discoveries – but I really did not expect one of these in particular. I found it fantastic; not cheesy or predictable at all.

Thank you to the author/publisher for accepting my request to read and review this book

My only criticisms are a few typos – which may be due to my copy only being an ARC – as well as the fact that some aspects were perhaps a bit overly dramatic. Theo’s actions at one point are really quite… drastic. Unbelievable, almost. But then, I suppose some people do handle things in similar ways.

4.5 stars for The Silent Patient.

Book Review: Thy Killer’s Keeper

You’d be forgiven for believing this is an ordinary detective novel. I thought it was throughout most of the book, honestly. But there are some vital and very unique aspects that are definitely science-fiction, even bordering on paranormal.

Detective John Salton is sent to work on a homicide case near Eureka. The case has no clear links to previous cases, but John is certain that it is the work of the same killer of almost a dozen other cases over the past nine years. The only link is the killer’s strange, morbid sense of curiosity – expressed through acts of violence toward the victim after they’re already dead.

At the same time, John is visiting his autistic son at the new care centre in Eureka. He admits to his partner, Ruby, that he believes the death of his wife – perpetrated by his own son – was also somehow caused by this same serial killer. But how is that possible?

This was truly exciting and intriguing throughout, and I was always waiting to see what happened next. Links to the fertility clinic were soon suggested, which added even more intrigue and excitement. It was superbly clever and incredibly unique. I’ve certainly not come across anything like this before.

At the end especially, the sci-fi elements became almost overpowering. It stopped feeling like so much of a deterctive/crime novel and more of a paranormal thriller or something. I personally thought it was a bit too paranormal, too far-fetched almost. But again, it was well thought out and clever. Though some parts were not particularly well explained in my opinion and kind of went over my head, honestly.

There were a fair few typos and spelling mistakes, such as names being spelled differently, which gave the novel a bit of an amateurish feel. I received an ARC though (thanks to Hidden Gems), and so the final publication may not include so many mistakes.

I thoroughly enjoyed the detective side of this novel, but the sci-fi aspects became a bit too overwhelming. 3.5 stars.

 

Book Review: Two Skies Before Night

A huge thanks to Hidden Gems for providing me with a copy of this book in return for my review.

At first I thought this was a detective novel, but I soon realised that it was far more sci-fi than I anticipated. This combination of science fiction and detective elements was really unique and honestly, I loved it.

Initially, Detective Lang is working on a double murder case. It seemed quite simple at first, if a bit strange what with all the bizarre descriptions of characters. It got a bit confusing when Lang began commenting on the ‘undersky’ and people from ‘Above’ and ‘Below’, but I soon figured it out. All these different elements made a thoroughly intriguing story, and things I didn’t think were important at first turned out to hold quite a deal of significance.

The Powers were really interesting. The few that were described were so strange, and I loved them. The few times these Powers interected with citizens of the City were strange, too, and I was really intrigued to see what the Powers actually did. They were like gods, feared but almost worshipped by everyone. I would have liked to find out a bit more about them – perhaps there will be a sequel that will reveal more.

There are a lot of intertwining details, which I always appreciate. It was definitely a unique story, with a lot of exciting moments and unexpected discoveries.

One issue I had with this book was that there were a few mistakes, misplaced commas and so on. The copy I received was a review copy, so I can’t be sure whether these mistakes are in the final publication, but I thought I should point them out just in case.

Overall, this was a really interesting book and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. 4 out of 5 stars.

Book Review: I Know You Know

A massive thanks to Edelweiss+ for giving me the opportunity to read this book.

Two young boys were murdered in 1996. Twenty years later, their best friend is revisiting the case in his own podcast. The man convicted of the murders has killed himself, and one reporter has published an article questioning the reliabilty of his conviction.

I would summarise the plot a bit more, but it’s really quite complicated. There are so many twists and turns, and little details that link together. The best way to understand abd appreciate these things is to read it yourself.

I really, really enjoyed this. The links that are uncovered throughout are fantastic. It was really interesting to see different sides of the story, too – we follow Detective Fletcher when he first works on the murder case, as well as twenty years later when the case is revisited. We also follow the friend of the boys, Cody Swift, as he produces his podcast, as well as one of the boys’ mother, Jess, as she struggles to hold her new family together. The different angles really made this unique and exciting. When new information is uncovered, it made me look at certain characters in a whole new way. Characters I initially liked turned out to be pretty horrible in reality.

One problem I did have was the amount of typos/grammar mistakes, but I can only assume that these are only present in my ARC and will be removed/rectified in the final publication.

I would definitely recommend reading this if you like excitement, thrillers, plot twists and crime novels. A strong 4.5 stars for I Know You Know.

Book Review: Murder Under The Christmas Tree

This is the third and final book I was given for Christmas, another collection of classic crime stories. It’s similar to Murder On Christmas Eve, so I’m not going to write too much in this review. Out of the two, though, this is my favourite collection.

The stories in this collection are, for the most part, very good. The last couple weren’t as engaging, but there’s always going to be one or two you don’t like. This collection even includes a tale about Sherlock Holmes (and Watson, of course) bt Arthur Conan Doyle himself. It was actually the first I’ve read of his work, and it was definitely as fantastic as I’d hoped.

Like the other book, the ten stories very from missing jewels hidden inside geese, to missing candle sticks, to death-by-radio. They’re all very interesting mysteries, again seemingly simple on the surface but always a lot more incricate than they seem.

A nice collection of classic “festive” crimes. 3.5 stars.

Book Review: The Mistletoe Murder and Other Stories

It’s getting a bit late to post these festive reviews so I’ll keep it short. It’s only a short book, anyway.

This book contains four short stories, all crime/detective tales, starting with The Mistltoe Murder. My personal favourite was the final story, The Twelve Clues of Christmas. Every story was great, though, and A Very Commonplace Murder was particularly surprising.

James manages to include a fantastic little hint/twist at the end of the stories, changing your whole perception on what you’ve just read. This made the crimes so much more interesting and real. They were relatively simple crimes – stabbings, poisoning – but there’s always a lot more going on under the surface than you’d expect.

A fantastic little collection, with a foreword by Val McDermid too. 4 stars.

Book Review: Murder on Christmas Eve

My dad gave me a few ‘festive’ crime/detective books for Christmas, and this is the first of the three I have read so far. It contains short stories from a selection of well-known authors in the genre, including Ian Rankin, Val McDermid and eight others. All taking place during the holiday season, the tales center around bizarre events that appear to have no rational explanation.
The stories and crimes are all very strange and it’s really interesting to see how the cases were solved. Who knew a cat could solve a murder? And the case of the missing manuscript had a very unexpected conclusion indeed.

I got the sense from these stories that I would have appreciated them more if I had read other works by the authors beforehand. Still, the stories were really interesting and had that classical mystery/detective feel to them. 3/5 stars.

Book Review: Apple Tree Yard

Who doesn’t like a good thriller novel?

The narrative of this book is quite unique, being recalled as an account from the past. Yvonne, the narrator, often refers to “now” and unknown events that have yet to take place in the story. This definitely builds the suspense a lot.

Yvonne takes us through the development of her extramarrital relationship with the unknown “you” (or “X” as she refers to him in her letters). Later, we will learn the identity of Yvonne’s lover, but throughout the book we are given only speculations about his life that Yvonne theorises to be accurate.

This affair is, I suppose, both shocking and familiar at the same time. Yvonne is a successful, loved wife and mother with a safe home and good career. She loves her husband and her children. Her affair is, in this respect, unexpected and outrageous. But at the same time, as Yvonne summarises at the end of the novel, her “one-off” offence falls perfectly into the typical category of people like her. People who do not cheat on their partners because they don’t love them. Unline “you”, who cheats repeatedly for the excitement of it.

Most of the book is dedicated to the devlopment of the relationship, with other details of Yvonne’s life and comments about the present included here and there. Yvonne is eventually sexually assaulted by a coworker/acquaintance. Amazingly, this event leads to Yvonne being on trial for murder.

The court case is described fantastically, with plenty of detail about all the little things that really set the scene. The narrative throughout the book is also fantastic – it really has the ‘feel’ of a middle-aged woman. 3.5 stars.Bookmarked Signature Logo

Book Review: The Jigsaw Man

The Jigsaw Man

The Jigsaw Man by Paul Britton – Paperback, 672 pages – Published May 15th 1998 by Corgi (first published May 1st 1997)

My psychology teacher recommended this book at the start of the year, and as it’s about the field of work I’m hoping to go into I thought I’d read it. It did take me quite a while to finish, but I still really enjoyed reading it.

Paul Britton, a successful forensic/criminal psychologist, goes into detail on some of the most horrific cases the UK has seen. He discusses his role in the House of Horrors, the contamination of Heinz products, and the abduction of a newborn baby, as well as countless other murders and rapes.

As well as his psychological profiles, Britton talks about his personal experience with working with the police, and how his personal life was affected. He also mentions his NHS career in psychology.

Because this is my ideal career, I found this all very fascinating. It definitely isn’t a book for the fainthearted, though – Britton’s descriptions of crime scenes and offences are brutally honest and vivid, and I was honestly so shocked by the cases he worked on. As Britton says, it really does make you see the world in a whole different light when you’re aware of offenders walking the streets right now.

This was really interesting and gave a lot of insight into the life and career of Paul Britton. It didn’t glamorise the career or the offences committed. 4 stars.

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