fairytale

Graphic Novel/Picture Book Review: The Little Red Wolf

35905318This is only a very short book, so the review will be short too. It’s based on the fairytale Little Red Riding Hood (as you may have guessed from the title). It’s a beautifully illustrated novel, with a really sweet message about love and friendship between humans and animals.

It follows a similar story to the original fairytale, but where the child captures the little wolf while he is delivering a rabbit to his hungry old grandmother. The child sings a song, which is gorgeously illustrated by Fléchais, which tells the tale of a woman and man falling in love, but the man then losing his wife to wolves. This, she says, is why her and her father hunt and kill wolves – because they are evil beasts that bring nothing but pain.

The little red wolf’s father comes to the rescue – without killing the girl or her father – and tells his son about the version of the song he knows – where the woman is friends with the wolves, weaving them capes (like the one the little red wolf wears) and the man accidentally shoots her himself. I found this to be really quite touching, and I really did like this interpretation of the fairytale.

pro_reader

Thank you to the author/publisher for accepting my request to read and review this book

I don’t think the chapters were necessary for such a short book – they didn’t mark the end of a “chapter” in any way for me, but just felt like they’d been randomly placed throughout the story.

Overall, this is definitely a lovely story for children to read, even if it is a little sad. The art was really lovely, and it told the story beautifully. 4 stars.

P.S. Sorry about the awful quality of the pictures. My laptop has a red light filter on and just doesn’t do the art justice at all.

866A98B32CBD639D32E20CEBF70E4491

Advertisements

Manga/Graphic Novel Review: Belle’s Tale

pro_reader

Thank you to the author/publisher for accepting my request to read and review this book

I’ve never actually read the original book of Beauty and the Beast but I love manga and thought I’d request a review copy from the publisher. I’m assuming it’s been kept pretty close to the original story, but like I said, I don’t really know.

Belle's Tale

Belle’s Tale (Beauty and the Beast Volume #1) by Mallory Reaves – eBook, 178 pages – Published March 2017 by TokyoPop

Most people are pretty familiar with the general plot of this tale, where Belle meets the Beast and is kept prisoner in exchange for her father’s freedom. She discovers the truth about what happened to her mother all those years ago, and begins to fall in love with the once-terrifying Beast. But when the village learns of his existence, they are not welcoming or friendly toward him. And his time is running out…

I’ve always found it to be a bit of a weird story, but I suppose it is kind of cute? But this review isn’t on the plot, as this is just an adaptation of the original. The art that’s used is quite nice, not particularly outstanding in my opinion but still good. I always find these manga adaptations to be a lot easier to understand, but the watermark on this review copy did get in the way a bit! Obviously, you won’t have that issue if you buy the novel, though.

If you’re a fan of the classic tale then you’d probably really like this. And it’d make a great gift, I think. 3.5 stars.

866A98B32CBD639D32E20CEBF70E4491

Book Review: Alice Takes Back Wonderland

Professional Reader

Usually, I read ebooks in the order my request to review them is accepted. However, I had to make an exception for this as it’s based on Alice in Wonderland – my favourite story. I was given the chance to review this book by NetGalley, who provided me with a free copy in return for my review.

22590207

Alice Takes Back Wonderland by David D. Hammons – eBook (Galley), 270 pages – Published September 28th 2015 by Curiosity Quills Press

This is a great, original book. It combines dozens of fairytales in one story, each tale and character with their own little twist.

17-year-old Alice from Missouri is on medication for ADHD and schizophrenia, which she was diagnosed with after an alleged visit to Wonderland ten years ago. She’s spent all this time trying to accept that Wonderland isn’t real – until the White Rabbit turns up at her house and pushes her back down the rabbit hole.

With the help of the Mat Hatter, Peter Pan and the Lost Boys, Pinocchio, Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, and many others, Alice has to defeat the Ace of Spades, who is removing the Wonder from Wonderland, and trying to turn it into the human world. Alice travels between Wonderland, Neverland and even the Grimm Kingdom, gaining allies and developing a plan. Along her way, Alice rescues Tinkerbelle from Hook (or Captain Gepetto, the father of Pinocchio who’s been mistaken for the crock’odial for quite some time), brings down the Gingerbread Man (a villain in Grimm), reunites Queen Cinderella Charming with her daughter Snow White, and even falls in love with Peter Pan.

Basically, this is a cross of all my favourite stories. I’m now in love with the idea of Alice and Peter Pan being an item, with each of them being one of my uttermost favourite characters. The idea is that echoes of Wonderland, Neverland, Grimm etc reach the human world through the rabbit hole, inspiring the stories we grow up loving. But as they are only echoes, many details aren’t quite right.

There’s a lot of action in this novel, especially toward the end. Like I said, all the characters are wonderfully unique, and have nice little quirks. Some of the writing is kind of… simple, but still descriptive. It’s also rather repetitive at times, though this is sometimes used to it’s advantage – certain quotes are repeated from the original book by Caroll, entwining this modern story with the older novel.

I didn’t find this as easy to read as I would’ve liked, though I did get into it in the end. The plot is great, and the characters too. I’d give this book 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4 if need be.

866A98B32CBD639D32E20CEBF70E4491