friendship

Book Review: Friendship Fails of Emma Nash

I’m back from Croatia now, so here is the updated review with links and images.

This is the second book in the Emma Nash series, but I read it as a standalone without reading the first. There are several moments where I’m sure I would’ve benefitted from having read the first book, but there is enough information in this book alone to understand what’s happened and follow the story. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and am now considering reading the series ‘properly’.

So as the title suggests, this is a book about Emma’s friendship mishaps. The entire book is comprised of Emma’s personal blog posts, which I really liked. It gave a very interesting narration, and allowed Seager to really develop the voice of Emma.

The ‘plot’ is a bit hard to explain, as it’s pretty much a collection of lots of little problems and events. The book starts with Emma outlining her new ‘resolutions’ which involve working on herself and her hobbies, and developing new friendships. She also focuses on not stalking her ex-boyfriend online, and strengthening her existing relationships. It sounds like the last book was a lot more romantically focused, and Emma emphasises how she is not looking for romantic relationships this time.

The friendships Emma attempts to form are… Disastrous. And in attempting to strengthen her existing friendships, she manages to have a major fall-out with her best friend, Steph. She does make some unexpected friends, though, and there is an interesting romantic plot throughout the book, too.

Her friendship with Gracie sounds like it went through some tough patches in the past, and the couple work on their relationship. Another close friend of Emma’s, Faith, has some big happenings regarding her own relationship with her girlfriend, too. I really liked how Seager included the same-sex relationship, and how she talks about the issues faced by the couple.

There are some fantastic moments in this, from a feminist POV. The girls openly discuss things such as sex and masturbation, and Emma even brings up the use of the word “slag” as a sexist term. I really appreciated how casually things are mentioned. There is even a moment where Steph’s boyfriend reacts to her period blood in a bad way, and the girls discuss how awful it is of him to do so.

I did find this a little bit immature at times, like Emma was acting quite young. Sometimes the grammar/punctuation was a little off, but then that fits the teenage voice of Emma, who is ‘writing’ the book through her blog. Usually I find books about friendships and romances, especially at this age, super cheesy and boring. But I actually really liked this! It was so easy to read, and such a feel-good book. Emma really emphasises the importance on working on you, and not letting external factors ruin your happiness. She even faces cyber bullying at one point, which is another extremely important topic.

NetGalley Badge

Thank you to the author/publisher for accepting my request to read and review this book

Overall, I really liked this. It was fun and happy and tackled some really important issues. 3.5 to 4 stars.

Advertisements

Book Review: Eden Summer

I keep falling behind on writing my reviews, sorry! I really need to get back on track. I finished this on Tuesday I think? I really enjoyed it, although it isn’t quite worthy of five stars.

I’m going to put in a trigger warning as there are mentions of substance abuse, physical abuse, death, adoption and suicide.

Jess’s best friend has gone missing. Through interviews with the police and Jess’s personal recollections, we begin to build up a picture of Eden’s life before her disappearance. Her sister had recently been killed in a car accident, and her seemingly perfect relationship with Liam was more complicated than anyone realised. Bit by bit, Jess – and we – begin to piece things together and discover where Eden has gone.

The girls are only young – 15 I think? – and very much have the all-consuming passion that young teens feel. As in, every little issue feels huge, and things feel far more serious than they might to an older person. I remember feeling this way. I think it was portrayed so accurately, the way fighting with your best friend feels like the end of the world and a family argument overwhelms you with guilt. It was a bit annoying in some ways, though; no fault of the author, of course, I just get a bit annoyed at kids taking things too seriously. I look back at myself and think how stupid it was to get so caught up in such little issues. So the things that Jess gets so worked up over just seemed a bit trivial to me, like she was exaggerating too much. But as I said, this creates the teenage voice really well in my opinion.

The things that both these girls have gone through are massive, though – Jess was attacked and Eden’s sister killed. That’s pretty hard for a young girl to deal with, and these are not the problems I’m saying are trivial. These are hugely important and emotional issues and I think it’s great to talk about. I love books with these real, albeit sad, events. I think it is so good to discuss all the feelings and situations that follow, and also emphasise how it is not the end of the world if something bad happens. life will continue. Eden says how she feels her sister’s death becoming more distant, more bearable, and how she doesn’t want that to happen. She feels guilty, as if she’s forgetting her and moving on. This is so important. She also thinks about killing herself due to guilt – which I won’t ruin too much – but then realises how she shouldn’t take life for granted. Her sister would’ve given anything to be alive still, and she shouldn’t be throwing that away.

It was a really good read and I found myself wondering what was going to be revealed next. It was well written and perfectly captured the young voice of Jess. If I read this when I was younger, I think I would’ve adored it. I would’ve understood it and connected to Jess more than I did now I’m older. 4 stars, definitely worth a read.