harpercollins

Book Review: The Hunting Party

The Hunting Party

The Hunting Party by Lucy Foley – ebook (ARC), Published December 3rd 2018 by HarperCollins

This was an incredibly interesting book. I’ve read several novels which alternate between different characters’ narrations, but this took that to a whole new level. Not only did we switch between characters regularly, we even switched between first and third person narrative. I found this a very unique choice.

At first, I will admit that the sheer number of different perspectives was a bit overwhelming. It was hard to keep up with who was who. But as I got further into the story I was able to make sense of things more, and I could tell what was important to the story and so on.

This is, essentially, a ‘whodunit’ kind of book. There is a large group of people isolated in the middle of nowhere, and a dead body. One of these remaining people must be responsible for the murder.

As well as the switching narratives, the story flips between ‘before’ the murder and ‘after’. Most of the first part of the novel is before, and we begin to learn about the group of guests’ past and relationships with one another. Bit by bit we see that everything is not quite as rosy as it first seemed.

The way the story slowly unravels was fantastic. Thrilling, exciting. And the number of revelations that are revealed one by one… As the reader, we don’t know which of these is important, and which is just a red herring. Everyone seems to have their issues, but does that mean they’re capable of murder?

NetGalley Badge

Thank you to the author/publisher for accepting my request to read and review this book

Once I got familiar with all the different characters and plots going on, I really enjoyed this. The pace increased dramatically toward the end, making it hard to put the book down. I’m giving this 4 to 4.5 stars.

Advertisements

Book Review: The Heir

The Heir

The Heir (The Selection #4) by Kiera Cass – Paperback, 342 pages – Published May 6th 2015 by HarperCollins Children’s Books (first published May 5th 2015)

This is the fourth novel in The Selection series by Kiera Cass. Twenty years after the Selection which led to the marriage of America and Prince Maxon, this book follows their eldest daughter, Eadlyn. As the older twin, she is destined to inherit the throne instead of her brother. She’s been preparing herself for the role since birth, and had every intention of doing so alone. But when the removal of the caste system fails to satisfy the public, it’s clear that a distraction is required. Reluctantly, Eadlyn agrees to take part in a Selection herself – but she’s certain she will not end up with a husband.

Much like her mother, Eadlyn’s attempt to avoid affection towards the candidates is futile; she actually finds herself feeling friendship (or more) to several of the boys she meets. Still, she tries to remain distant – romance was always her brother Ahren’s thing.

The twins are as close as is possible, but Eadlyn finds herself fearing the loss of him. He’s been deeply in love with the French heir for a while, and Eadlyn’s attempt to separate them backfires drastically. And then, on top of everything, their mother falls ill suddenly. Finally, Eadlyn begins to realise the importance of this Selection.

The reluctance to actually engage in the Selection was very similar to America in the first book. Too similar, maybe. And the change of heart followed the same pattern, too. But maybe it won’t end in love this time. (I’ll have to read the next book and find out!)

Eadlyn’s quite a “typical” feminist sort of figure – believing she will be the best queen without any husband around. But Ahren makes a fantastic point, saying she’s able to fall in love and have a beautiful wedding and love fashion and flowers while still being the strong, brave queen she is inside. To me, that’s what feminism is truly about. It was nice to see this view – from a boy, nonetheless – challenging the original view of Eadlyn.

Also, Eadlyn is a very strong, blunt girl most of the time – her way of being strong is, often, being rather rude. And eventually, she actually sees that in herself and realises that maybe she doesn’t have to be that way to be powerful and successful. Her admiration (and jealousy) of Ahren’s girlfriend also confirms this; she’s a petite, gentle girl, but is taken seriously by everyone around her. She is not harsh like Eadlyn, yet she is not taken for granted by anyone. A girl can be beautiful and feminine, yet still be a powerful authoritative figure.

Although it was pretty similar to the first book, I still did enjoy it. And Eadlyn’s attraction to so many suitors means that this could go any way, so I do look forward to finding out who she will end up with – if anyone. This series has always been really enjoyable and easy to read. 4 stars for The Heir.

866A98B32CBD639D32E20CEBF70E4491

Book Review: Fire Colour One

23499242

Fire Colour One by Jenny Valentine – Paperback, 256 pages – Published July 1st 2015 by HarperCollins

This is one of those books that you see displayed in the library and just think, “What the heck? I’ll give it a go.”

This is YA book, as most of the books I read are. It’s named after a painting, which ends up as quite a significant aspect in this novel.

Iris lives with her mother Hannah and step-father Lowell. She doesn’t remember her real father. Hannah has always told her that he didn’t want her, that he didn’t care. She blamed him for their debts, their problems.

Thurston is Iris’s best friend, her only friend. He means everything to her. He’s always been there for her, until she has to move away to England without any means of telling him where she’s gone.

Iris herself is a pretty troubled girl. Family life isn’t great – Hannah and Lowell want her to be more like them, more conscious of her appearance and wealth. But all Iris really cares about is fire. There’s nothing like the soothing flicker of a flame.

When she meets her father Ernest, Iris soon realises that everything she’s been told by her mother has been a lie. He didn’t leave her; Hannah took her, changed her name and hid. Ernest had been searching for her for years. But now it was too late.

The book actually begins with Ernest’s funeral, and sort of goes backwards a few times. There’s memories written throughout, clips from the past. We slowly learn more and more about Iris’s personality, and we watch her re-develop her relationship with her father.

It’s actually a pretty great book. It’s so realistic, and unique. It isn’t a fantasy, it isn’t a cheesy romance, it isn’t even really a book with a typical happy ending.

Although I wouldn’t have searched this book out in particular, I am happy I read it. I’m not sure it quite gets 4 stars from me, so I’ll give it 3.5.

866A98B32CBD639D32E20CEBF70E4491