ya

Graphic Novel/Comic Book Review: At the End of Your Tether

At the End of Your Tether by Adam Smith – Published (first published November 12th 2019)

I’m only going to write a fairly brief review of this graphic novel, simply because I don’t want to give too much of the plot away for any other potential readers. This means I might have to keep it quite vague, too, so I apologise in advance!
An extremely simplified summary of the plot is that Ludo’s girlfriend goes missing under rather peculiar circumstances. When a body is found alongside the burned wreckage of her car, most people accept that she is dead. But Ludo doesn’t – he’s sure something is wrong with the whole situation and is determined to find answers.
And he does eventually find answers. But I was left with so many questions; I really would have liked more detail and information about how it all worked and why it happened. I was just left confused, honestly.
Don’t get me wrong, the writing was great and I did enjoy it. The premise was really unique and interesting, too. I just would have liked to understand things a bit more.

Thank you to the author/publisher for accepting my request to read and review this book

The art was great, too. It was detailed and clear, and generally really quite pleasant to look at.
I’m giving this book 3.5 stars overall.

Book Review: Nemesis

Nemesis by Brendan Reichs – Published July 13th 2017 by Macmillan Children’s Books (first published March 21st 2017)

This is the last review I need to write to get back on track (finally!) It’s only going to be brief I’m afraid, though!
I love Kathy Reichs, especially her Virals series, and naturally thought I would enjoy this, too. And I did, to a degree – just not as much as I had expected to. The book alternates between two narrators, Noah and Min. They don’t seem to have that much in common, except that every other year, on their birthday, they are both murdered. They then wake up in different places the next morning, alive and well.
I will not go into too much depth on this, but it’s probably quite obvious that this odd occurrence freaks both kids out. And of course, they want to know what the heck is going on, and why it’s happening to them. Their paths eventually cross, and they discover that they are both ‘Betas’ in a secret project.
It was an intriguing storyline, and I am really interested to know more. But it was also a bit… I don’t know, my questions weren’t all answered. In fact, not many of them were at all. I also didn’t really connect with the characters as much as I did with Virals, so that was a shame.
Overall, I’m giving it 3.5 stars. Maybe one day I’ll continue reading the series, but it’s not really a priority.

Book Review: Superpowerless

Superpwerless by Chris Priestley – Published June 15th 2017 by Hot Key Books

I’ve quite liked Chris Priestley’s work in the past, but this was… odd. It wasn’t quite what I’d thought it was going to be. I appreciated the comic book references – David’s coping mechanism, if you will, is his superpowered alter-ego. I liked David’s character in this sense, and in several others, but I couldn’t get past one main factor: he spies on girls from his bedroom window using his telescope. Okay, he does acknowledge that it’s wrong, and it started out as an accident, and he even admits to the girl he watches that he watches her. But I still found it weird.
There’s a lot going on in this book (besides David spying on Holly, his neighbour). David actually begins to care for Holly after learning about her personal life, and David himself is still grieving his father. He has some girl problems, too, and ends up falling out with his closest friend, Joe. Amongst all the semi-normal adolescent problems, David also finally comes to term with a huge reality that he already knew, but could never bring himself to accept. It’s the reason he visualises himself as a superhero who can never quite save the car – or the people in it.
This was pretty unique in its own right, and touching, too. David’s relationships are all quite strained, and it takes some effort to repair things – effort that David has been neglecting to give up until now. 3.5 stars.

Book Review: Moth Girls

Moth Girls by Anne Cassidy – Published January 7th 2016 by Hot Key Books

I finished this book so long ago. I can’t believe I am only just getting round to writing the review… I’m afraid it will only be a quick one again, though.
This is a YA thriller/mystery novel where Mandy is recalling the disappearance of her two best friends five years ago, surfacing now due to the demolition of the house that they disappeared in, never to return. She remembers the things they did together, even that very day when they vanished. And she becomes obsessed with finding answers, determined to figure out what truly happened.
It’s a great book, honestly. It was exciting and intriguing and clever. It covered some unexpected, serious issues, and was resolved in an oddly and tragically nice way.
It’s definitely a good read for younger thriller fans, but can also be enjoyed by older readers, I think. 4 stars!

Book Review: We Are Not Okay

We Are Not Okay by Natália Gomes – Published May 2nd 2019 by HQ Young Adult

I’m desperately trying to write up the reviews of all the books I’ve finished over the past few months before the end of the year. Hopefully, I’ll keep on top of things next year!
Now this book was fantastic at tackling multiple social issues in modern society – issues that many girls and women have to deal with. Some of the main themes are teenage pregnancy, having underwear pictures leaked on the internet, rape, and disordered eating. These things aren’t all experienced by one single character, but by multiple girls whose stories are intricately intertwined with one another. This book alternates between different characters’ accounts/narratives, and the reader slowly pieces together the bigger picture of how they all connect.
I found it really clever how Gomes did this, actually. She managed to really accurately portray how one small action can affect so many other people. She also explored how young girls have the ability to help each other when in need and can overcome petty differences and feuds in order to tackle the real, serious issues. This is something that I think is often forgotten but should be remembered by more young women. There is often too much bitterness and dispute amongst girls in schools when we should put more effort into uniting, standing together and helping each other through difficulties.

Thank you to the author/publisher for accepting my request to read and review this book

The ending of this book was quite shocking, too, but in a sadly realistic way. I won’t discuss it too much, though. I did still find it a little too neatly wrapped-up, in a way, though; not everyone responds so well, not all girls do forgive each other or become so close. Which is a shame, but it is the truth.
Overall, I’m giving this book 4 stars out of 5.

Book Review: Read Me Like A Book

Read Me Like A Book by Liz Kessler – Published May 14th 2015 by Indigo

Another short review. (Sorry; I promise there will be some proper ones coming along soon!)
This book is about a teenager called Ash. We follow her through the start and end of a relationship with Dylan, the separation of her parents, and a huge falling-out with her best friend, Cat. Alongside all of this, Ash fears she is pregnant, and also begins to question her sexuality – brought on by her odd feelings towards a new substitute teacher. Basically, she is having a really hard time.
All of these issues are important ones to bring awareness to. I’m not sure if all the themes were discussed to as much depth as they could have been, though; I guess having so much going on means you can’t go into as much detail. Still, I think they were all represented pretty well, though I don’t have much personal experience with most of these things.
It was a really easy book to read; I saw several people mention how they read it all in one sitting. LGBTQ+ books are always important, and the combination of topics addressed was really quite unique. 3.5 stars overall.

Book Review: Are We All Lemmings & Snowflakes?

Are We All Lemmings & Snowflakes? by Holly Bourne – Published August 9th 2018 by Usborne Publishing Ltd

I cannot believe it’s been four months since I read this book! Again, this will only be a quick review. I found this book at my local library and having read Holly Bourne before, I knew I’d enjoy it. It’s about mental health, too (as many of her books are), so that was another reason I picked it up.
Olive has had problems with her mental health for years but refuses to be told her diagnosis. She goes through phases of extreme ‘happiness’ (otherwise known as mania) followed by severe depressive episodes. When she’s offered a free place at an experimental new treatment centre, she is more than happy to accept. She doesn’t know exactly what’s wrong with her, but she’s desperate to find the cure.
While at the facility – called Camp Reset – Olive makes some interesting friends. She also finds herself in a manic state without even realising it, and focuses all her energy on an innovative algorithm she believes can cure or prevent mental illnesses. Of course, this leads to a huge crash, which prevents Olive from partaking in the grand finale of her and her friends’ plan to spread happiness.
Throughout her treatment, Olive goes through a lot of things. She faces rejection and learns to help others. She also begins to work on her attitudes towards herself.
The main thing I’ve got to say about this book is the relatability of it. The thoughts that Olive has, and the way they cycle round her head on repeat, were incredibly close to home. When something bad happens, her first reaction is to blame and hate herself. I related to her character so, so much in this way.
I also really liked how Olive is not the stereotypical ‘nice’ girl. She’s not quiet and quirky and lovable. She’s a bit of a bitch sometimes, quite frankly. But mental illnesses don’t give you a free pass to being a jerk. They often make people more of a jerk, honestly. It’s important to acknowledge this. It’s important to think about how your actions affect others, even though it’s hard when you don’t care about yourself or anything at all.
This was a fantastic portrayal of mental illness, and of recovery. It didn’t have a perfect ending – Olive acknowledges how she’s got so much farther to go, and that her journey to recovery is only just beginning. She also learns how there is no easy cure, which I think people forget sometimes. 4.5 stars!

Book Review: Dead Ends

Dead Ends by Erin Lange – Published July 3rd 2014 by Faber Faber (first published September 3rd 2013)

This is just going to be a brief review.
Erin Lange is a great author, with a really enjoyable style that makes her books easy to read.
This book follows a young boy named Dane, who makes a surprising friend; Billy. Dane is feared by the other kids at school due to his violent reputation. But Billy manages to use Dane is a way of deterring other bullies, leading to an unexpected friendship between the boys.
Their friendship involves a sort of deal, where Dane promises to help Billy find his father. But as Dane learns more about Billy’s past, he starts to wonder whether he’s doing the right thing.
Like I said, Lange’s writing is really easy to read. This story was surprisingly heart-warming, with a rather bittersweet ending. It tackled some serious issues that I think are so important for kids to learn about, too.
Overall, I’m giving this 3.5 to 4 stars out of 5.

Book Review: The Astonishing Colour of After

The Astonishing Colour of After by Emily X.R. Pan – Published March 22nd 2018 by Orion Children’s Books

Another book I read almost four months ago now (oops!). I think it’s time to get this review written!

I was immediately drawn to this book when I read the blurb. Leigh is a young woman struggling to accept her mother’s suicide. She finds herself travelling to Taiwan to meet her mother’s parents, where Leigh discovers more about her mother and her family than she ever expected.

This book was written beautifully, with colours expressing emotion. Leigh is an artist and thus pretty much thinks in terms of colour. It’s also an amazing mix of real-life, sorrow and loss, and fantasy. I don’t want to go into too much detail, but Leigh is convinced her mother is visiting her even after her death, but in a very different form.

As well as all the emotions surrounding the loss of her mother, Leigh addresses the issues around being a “half-blood”. As a child of mixed-race parents myself, I found some of the things in this book incredibly relatable. But it wasn’t an overbearing part of the story though, which I thought was fantastic.

This was a really emotional book, fantastically written. It was sad but heart-warming. 5 stars; I loved it!

Book Review: Beautiful Creatures

Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia & Margaret Stohl – Published February 4th 2010 by Penguin Books (first published December 1st 2009)

So I finally got round to reading this a little while back. I’ve seen bits and pieces of the movie on TV, but never really knew what it was about. It is quite a romance-based story, but I enjoyed it more than I anticipated.
Again, I read this quite a while ago, so my review is only going to be short.
Ethan has nightmares where he loses someone – someone he’s never met before. And then one day she appears. She turns up at school, the niece of the creepy guy who lives in the creepy mansion. She’s not exactly normal herself, either. The other kids at school pick up on this immediately, and she becomes the centre of attention. And not the good kind.
I’m not going to tell you the whole plot, but it’s full of mystery and magic and a fair bit of romance. There’s even loss; there is one particular moment toward the end that I found particularly poetic. (If you read it, here’s a hint: it’s to do with Macon and rain.)
The ending in particular left me wanting to read on. I’m actually putting this series on my Christmas wish list! 4.5 stars.